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George Fallis and Mary Ridgeway



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George FALLIS and Mary RIDGEWAY




Husband George FALLIS

         Born: Abt 1747 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas FALLIS (Abt 1698-1756) 2
       Mother: Elizabeth Jane CHELDON (Abt 1701-      )


      Married: 1754 - Virginia




Wife Mary RIDGEWAY

         Born: Abt 1748
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John FALLIS

         Born: 1754 - Falmouth Co., Stafford Virginia
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary ANTRAM (1758-      )
         Marr: 10 Apr 1776 - Stafford Co., Virginia



2 F Jane FALLIS

         Born: Abt 1758
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Rachel FALLIS

         Born: Abt 1760
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Joseph GORDON (Abt 1759-      )
         Marr: 18 Dec 1792



4 M Richard FALLIS

         Born: Abt 1762
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Phebe DILLON (Abt 1763-      )
         Marr: 16 May 1798



5 M Job FALLIS

         Born: Abt 1765
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Thomas FALLIS

         Born: Abt 1767
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary JAMES (Abt 1769-      )
         Marr: 29 May 1797 - Orange County




General Notes (Husband)

George migrated to Stafford County, Virginia and became a substantial landowner, probably with funds inherited from his father Thomas. His plantation bordered the Washington plantation. George Washington at the age of sixteen went to the Shenandoah Valley as a surveyor on the wilderness holdings of Lord Halifax. So George Fallis was well acquainted with George Washington as well as being his neighbor.

The first record or Quaker affiliation was a minute of Hopewell Monthly Meeting, Virginia dated 5/7/1764 granting membership to George Fallis of Stafford. When the revolution broke out he gave considerable amounts of money to the Continental cause directly through his neighbor, General Washington. Because of his Quaker beliefs, he did not bear arms but he did give direct aid and sympathy which was regarded later as ancestral ties by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

He was formally received back to Hopewell Monthly Meeting by a minute dated 5/10/1777. The last record that mentions him is in the Hopewell minute of 7/7/1780 indicating disunity for "taking a test". 17


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